Our Animals

Splitters Farm

A sanctuary for farm animals

Your entry fees allow us to continue to feed our rescue animals and pay our vets who maintain their health and well-being.

Scroll below to see the types of animals you can expect to see at Splitters Farm.

If you’d like to assist us further, you can make a one-off donation or alternatively become a Rescue Squad Member and enjoy a number of member benefits.

Our Horses

We have seven horses at Splitters Farm. Every new horse costs us $1500 the week we take them in, between having their vaccinations, microchipping, worming, feet and teeth checked. Horses are incredibly intelligent but take a lot of looking after which means lots of $$$. They need a pedicure every 2 months and can get very sick if they eat the wrong food. Horses are unfortunately also the biggest victims of drought. They eat 4-6 times what a cow will, which is why so many farmers move them on as they attempt to salvage whatever grass / crops they have left.

Our Horses
Our Goats

Our Goats

Goats are extremely sociable creatures and cheeky as hell. They will, quite literally, eat the shirt off your back if given the opportunity which is why they are great weed eaters. Just do not let them near your washing line. Because goats are so sociable you can easily tell if one is ill or about to give birth as they will normally go off on their own for some ‘alone time’. Our tribe of misfits have come from all over the place but most because of a change of their owners’ circumstances. We’ve lost count of how many we have on the farm but they are by far our most popular with most.

Our Alpacas

Our 3 alpacas are the guardians of the goat herds. They look after the young like Nannies and let us know if there is danger to the group such as wild dogs. Alpaca’s are pregnant for 11 months and normally give birth to a single baby. Ours are a little skittish and do not like to be touched on the tops of their heads. Although Alpacas have a bad reputation for spitting, ours are very polite. To establish if an alpaca is pregnant you can conduct what is called a ‘Spit test’. It’s where you put a male and female in the stable (previously serviced) and if the female alpaca spits and kicks at the male, then she’s pregnant however, if she submits to him within 30sec, it’s a good indication that she’s not pregnant and you can just leave them to it.

Our Alpacas
‘Shadow’ the Kelpie

‘Shadow’ the Kelpie

Shadow was born in late 2019 and is our working dog. He’s an Australian Kelpie, a sheep dog successful at mustering and droving with little or no guidance. It’s thought that all Kelpies are approximately 25% dingo which is why perhaps he looks like one. The Kelpie has been exported throughout the world and is used to muster livestock, primarily sheep, cattle and goats.

Our Bees

We have many flow hives on the property and several traditional hives in our orchard. Bees will travel up to 4 kilometres to find flowers and use an internal GPS to find their way back to the hive. Our bees are European bees so please do not get too close or stand in the flight path or they may sting. Our beautiful honey is available for sale in our main office during most months of the year.

Our Bees
Our Sheep

Our Sheep

We have many rescues that make up our dorper herd. Dorper’s self-shed meaning they do not require shearing which is a great feature of this breed. They simply rub their winter coat off against trees or up and down on the fences.

Our Cows

You may already be aware that we are a working cattle farm with approximately 40 head of cattle at any one time. However, our very first rescue animals at Splitters Farm were a herd of seven Dexter cows (half sized cows that are good at escaping paddocks). They came from a property west of Gin Gin that had run out of water and are represented by the 7-stars in the Splitters Farm logo. We’ve since sold that little Dexter herd to a lovely old couple (with better fences) and we now like to call ourselves ‘serious cattle farmers’ because our cows are our livelihood. They are currently separated into two herds, of which a majority are Droughtmasters and Brahman.

Our Cows
Our Chickens

Our Chickens

In the big shed are our original ‘Point of Lay’ chooks or ‘Isa Browns’ who came from chicken farms that no longer wanted them because they were not at their laying peek anymore. The problem though with chickens raised in commercial environment, such as caged/battery egg factories, is they rarely tend to develop maternal instincts or get ‘clucky’. Therefore, we take the fertilised eggs off our ladies and put them in an incubator. The eggs rotate in an incubator for 21 days before they hatch out baby chickens. The eggs need to be under the right temperature and humidity conditions to hatch as the humidity softens the egg so that the chick can break through the shell. We tend to let our roosters free range to prevent them fighting with other males.

Our Turkeys

Do not let their size scare you, our four large turkeys are not vicious however the boys sometimes fight during breeding season. Female turkeys prefer males with long ‘snoods’ (red skin around their head). Snood length can also be used to predict the winner of a competition between two rival males.

Our Turkey
Our Geese

Our Geese

Geese can chase and give a wicked pinch if they are being territorial. Best way to avoid being chased is not to turn your back on them and stand your ground. Our gaggle of geese came from two families in South Kolan. Some came to be here because their former owners had too many geese already and needed them gone; the others came to us because a lady had to flee the area quickly due to domestic violence.

Our Ducks

Most of our ducks are Muscovy’s. The Muscovy duck is a large duck native to Mexico and Central and South America. Our ducks have come from several places but most because a couple had a mother duck in a rental property in Avoca who had 30 eggs which all hatched at once. Their landlord was not a happy camper and they had to go. We have so many at Splitters Farm we have lost count.

Our Ducks
Our Guineafowl

Our Guineafowl

The Black and white spotted birds wandering around the property are called Guineafowls. Guinea’s are known for being ‘natures pest control’. They pick bugs off our plants in the orchard, eat ticks and even kill baby snakes. They have a loud and sometimes obnoxious call which is how you distinguish the girls from boys as they sound quite different. We collect their eggs from around the farm and put them in the incubator and sell them at a local produce supplier as young ‘keets’ so other farmers can reap the benefits of these noisy little birds.

Our Guinea Pigs

A few fun facts about our Guinea Pigs. They are not actually from New Guinea but from the Andes region in South America. They have an odd number of toes & chat to each other, so listen out to hear how they squeak to each other in their pen.

Our Guinea Pigs
Animals

Our Pigs

Down the end of the lane you will find the pig pens. Pigs can have up to two-three litters each year, are highly intelligent, love to dig and find weaknesses in the fences. Hence why our pig paddock has an electric wire right the way around the bottom of it. This white wire is as much to keep our lot in, as it is to keep the wild pigs out. Wild pigs can spread disease. Some farmers even put rings in their pig’s noses to stop them from digging. Pigs will eat just about anything, even their water troughs which is why we supply ours with fresh drinking water via metal ‘nipples’ attached to the enclosures. Even though our big pigs are rescues, our babies at Splitters Farm are sold to other families who want a pet pig. Pigs can have up 10 piglets in each litter ...that’s a lot of mouths to feed.

Sponsors

Splitters Farm rely on the in-kind support & financial backing of the following corporate sponsors:

ISDD
Universal Home Improvements
Alowishus Bundaberg

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Phone 07 4159 9348
After Hours Phone 0438 246 318

Email info@splittersfarm.com.au

Visit 205 Blairs Rd, Sharon QLD 4670

10 min drive north of Bundaberg's bustling central business district, Splitters Farm is a rural camping & day-trip experience set amongst lush tropical bushland, the 160 acre property is bordered by Splitters Creek.

Splitters Farm